Resources - Registered Charities

Lawnow Articles

Charities provisions in the 2012 federal Budget generated more attention than any measures relating to the sector have in a very long time. The government announced that it was tightening rules around charities’ political activities. The focus of the new requirements was mostly on enhanced reporting; however, embedded in the announcement was a crucial substantive change.
A thoughtful look at salaries, compensation, and retirement benefits of employees of registered charities. LawNow Volume 34, Issue 3 (January/February 2010)
This article discusses CRA's recently published guidance for registered charities on using an intermediary to carry out a charity's activities in Canada. The guidance discusses several avenues for working with non-charities to advance and organization's purposes.
The recent controversy over exclusion of the group Right to Play from the Vancouver Winter Olympics sheds light on a little discussed – or understood – corner of charity law. This article discuss the issues involved in this controversy. LawNow Volume 33, Issue 3 (January/February 2009) (keywords: sponsorship)
Article discusses latest proposals brought forward by Imagine Canada and others to enhance the tax treatment of charitable donations in hopes that they will be included in the spring 2010 federal budget. LawNow Volume 34, Issue 4 (March / April 2010)
In this LawNow column, we review the notion of fiscal agent as it has developed in United States and comment on its application and misapplication in this country.
Think your workforce is made of of independent contractors and not employees? The Employment Insurance Act and the Canada Pension Plan provides for some adverse consequences if you are wrong.
This article takes a look at "social enterprise" and not-for-profits in light of two recent rulings from the Canada Revenue Agency which suggest that non-profit organizations cannot intentionally generate surpluses and retain their Income Tax Act (ITA) non-profit status.
What kinds of business can a charity operate? Does the answer depend on the amount of money the operation makes? Is it an issue how the money is distributed? Or, is the answer related to the nature of the business — what is being done? Does it matter how the business is run? And anyway, why can’t charities do anything they want? These and similar questions increasingly preoccupy charities and their regulators. But why, in fact, are these questions at all? Explaining why these are questions and, in turn, answering them is a useful way to review the legal nature of charity and how our legal system regulates business-like operations. (keywords = related businesses, social enterprise_

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